Quinn

in

Holding Out for a Hero

 

 

             Quinn sat in her bedroom, hugging her smiley pillow as the tears ran down her face. Lindy had set her up with Trent, was this revenge for Quinn pushing her to stop drinking? Had everyone at the parties been laughing at her behind her back the whole time? Could her social radar really be that out of tune away from her high school friends? How could Trent do that do her? She had really, really liked him . . . hadn’t she?

            With a sniffle, she wiped her face on the back of her pillow and reached over to turn on her radio. The music was upbeat, but the woman singing seemed to be screaming the lyrics; belting them out as if from her very soul.

 

Where have all the good men gone

And where are all the gods?

Where’s the street-wise Hercules

To fight the rising odds?

 

Isn’t there a white knight upon a fiery steed?

Late at night I toss and I turn and I dream of what I need

 

I need a hero

I'm holding out for at hero 'till the end of the night

He's gotta be strong

And he's gotta be fast

And he's gotta be fresh from the fight

 

I need a hero

I’m holding out for a hero 'till the morning light

He’s gotta be sure

And it’s gotta be soon

And he’s gotta be larger than life

 

            “Good men?” Quinn muttered. “Ha. I was better off sticking with Joey, Jeffie, and Jamie; they never wanted to hurt me.”

            There was a light knock at her door.

            “The door you’ve reached is disconnected,” Quinn said, remembering one of Daria’s lines. “If you feel you’ve reached this message in error, please go bother the other sister.”

            Her bedroom door swung open and she saw her father standing in the hallway light, looking in at her with a concerned look on his face.

            “Everything ok, sweetheart?”

            “Don’t look at me, Daddy. My make-up is all smudgy.”

            Jake walked in and sat on the edge of the bed next to his youngest daughter and put one arm around her shoulders. “You wanna talk to ol’ Jake? I . . . uh . . . called your mother but she said she was busy and hung up on me, so I guess it’s Dad or nothing.”

            “Daddy . . . I . . . oh, God. Daria was right, I am a vapid, shallow moron.” Quinn hiccupped and started crying again, dropping her pillow and hugging her father.

            Jake looked panicked for a moment and then hesitantly started petting the back of her head. A memory flash came to him of holding her just this way when she was a toddler and one of Daria’s movies had given her nightmares. He started quietly murmuring to her, mostly nonsense words but comforting all the same.

            “You’re not any of those things,” Jake said when the crying jag subsided. “And if that’s what’s got you so heartbroken I’m going to have some strong words with your sister when she gets home.”

            In the background, the radio kept playing.

 

Somewhere after midnight

In my wildest fantasy

Somewhere just beyond my reach

There’s someone reaching back for me

 

Racing on the thunder and rising with the heat

It’s gonna take a superman to sweep me off my feet

 

I need a hero

I'm holding out for a hero 'till the end of the night

He's gotta be strong

And he's gotta be fast

And he's gotta be fresh from the fight

 

I need a hero

I’m holding out for a hero 'till the morning light

He’s gotta be sure

And it’s gotta be soon

And he’s gotta be larger than life

 

I need a hero

I'm holding out for at hero 'till the end of the night

 

            “It’s not Daria’s fault,” Quinn said. “God, this is embarrassing.”

            “I could try to call your mother again.”

            “No, she’d just lecture me and I couldn’t stand that right now,” Quinn shrugged and tried a small smile. “I needed to cry on my Daddy.”

            “That’s what I’m here for, sweetheart.”

            “Daddy, I . . . I had sex with a guy, and tonight he dumped me in front of a whole crowd of people. He said mean things, that I was shallow and dumb because we have money.”

            “Gah! My little girl had . . . my baby . . . you . . . gah!”

            “Daddy.”

            “Sorry, sweetie. Who is this jerk? I’m gonna go teach him a lesson he won’t soon forget. When your mother gets home, tell her to come bail me out.”

            Jake started to stand and Quinn grabbed his arm and held him down. “It won’t help, Daddy. Please?”

            “Ok, sweetie. I just can’t stand to see you all torn up like this.”

            “I’ll . . . I’ll be ok, maybe this is one of those growing up things. I just thought I really liked him.”

            “Thought?”

            “Yeah,” Quinn sighed and looked at the floor. “Now I think maybe I went after him because Daria used to like him. Sort of petty of me, wasn’t it?”

            “You still didn’t deserve . . . .”

            “I’m not saying I did,” Quinn said.

            Mostly ignored, the radio played on.

 

Up where the mountains meet the heavens above

Out where the lightning splits the sea

I could swear there is someone somewhere

Watching me

 

Through the wind and the chill and the rain

And the storm and the flood

I can feel his approach

Like a fire in my blood

 

I need a hero

I'm holding out for a hero 'till the end of the night

He’s gotta be strong

And he's gotta be fast

And he's gotta be fresh from the fight

 

I need a hero

I'm holding out for a hero 'till the morning light

He's gotta be sure

And it's gotta be soon

And he's gotta be larger than life

 

I need a hero

I'm holding out for a hero 'till the end of the night

He's gotta be strong

And he's gotta be fast

And he's gotta be fresh from the fight

 

            “I just wonder how many people knew this was coming, if they’ve all been laughing at me behind my back this whole time,” Quinn said.

            “You mean your new college friends?”

            “Yeah.”

            “You seem to have gotten along with them all pretty well,” Jake said. “That one girl you brought over for dinner was very polite. What her name? Linda?”

            “Lindy,” Quinn said. “She sort of helped set me up with this guy.”

            “But you already knew him,” Jake said.

            “Yeah, I guess it was more like she helped me work up the nerve to ask him out. Can you imagine that, me asking a guy out?”

            “You tried it once before.”

            “Yeah, and it didn’t work out that time, either.” Quinn looked up at her father sharply. “You knew about the thing with David?”

            “Ol’ Jakey has a little more going on than you give him credit for, sweetie. Now, I wouldn’t worry about your other friends if I were you.”

            “Why not?”

            “Quinn, you read people better than anyone I know. If they weren’t really your friends, you’d know it.”

            “You’re right,” Quinn said. “Thanks, Daddy.”

            “No problem, sweetie.”

            “Ok, I’m gonna call Stacy and spend some more time crying.”

            “You want me to run down to the store and buy some ice cream?”

            “God, Daddy.” Quinn rolled her eyes. “Not all girls pork out over guys, you know.”

            “Sorry, sweetie.”

            “Besides, Stacy will bring some when she comes over.”

            “Alright, if you need anything I’ll be downstairs.” Jake left, pulling the door closed behind him. With a small sigh he went downstairs to mix himself a pitcher of martinis.

 

 

Disclaimers: Stereo Hifi font is ©1997 by Cathy Davies. This story based on characters and situations created by Glenn Eichler and Susie Lewis. The Daria TV show is a trademark of MTV Networks, a division of Viacom International Inc. and is referenced here without permission, and without profit. Holding Out for a Hero lyrics by Bonny Tyler. Original characters and situations created by the author are under (K) – all rights reversed. Hail Eris.

 

            Author: the NightGoblyn